Radiology

RadiologyRadiology at TMC Bonham Hospital encompasses the area of medicine that uses X-rays, radioactive tracers and ultrasonic waves to detect, diagnose and guide treatment of numerous diseases and injuries. Developments in technology, computers and science are further advancing the capability to image inner body structures, tissues and organs.

The dynamic images that radiology provides are essential to both physicians and patients, thanks to their realistic depiction of the anatomy, functions and abnormalities within the body. Radiologists can interpret imaging studies, act as consultants to other specialists and perform interventional procedures. There are several categories of radiological procedures.

Digital Mammography

Digital mammography differs from traditional mammography, which creates images on film, by capturing electronic images of the breast and transferring the images directly to a computer. The results images are clearer and sharper than film images, giving radiologists a greater opportunity to detect and evaluate small tumors and other abnormalities that may be present. To schedule an appointment, call 903-640-7373.

Computerized Tomography

Computerized Tomography or CT is a medical imaging procedure that utilizes computer-processed X-rays to produce tomographic images or 'slices' of specific areas of the body. These cross-sectional images are used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in various medical disciplines.

Digital geometry processing is used to generate a three-dimensional image of the inside of an object from a large series of two-dimensional X-ray images taken around a single axis of rotation. Exams can be performed with or without IV or oral contrast. IV Contrast is an agent given in the vein that will helps the physician see the veins and arteries of a specific area. Oral Contrast is an liquid that you drink. The oral contrast fills the digestive track so it can be better viewed on the test.

Echocardiogram

Echocardiogram, often referred to as a cardiac echo or simply an echo is a sonogram of the heart. Echocardiography uses standard two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and Doppler ultrasound to create images of the heart. Echocardiography has become routinely used in the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of patients with any suspected or known heart diseases. It is one of the most widely used diagnostic tests in cardiology. It can provide a wealth of helpful information, including the size and shape of the heart, pumping capacity, and the location and extent of any tissue damage. An Echocardiogram can also give physicians other estimates of heart function such as a calculation of the cardiac output, ejection fraction, and diastolic function (how well the heart relaxes). The use of Stress Echocardiography may also help determine whether any chest pain or associated symptoms are related to heart disease. The biggest advantage to echocardiography is that it is noninvasive (doesn't involve breaking the skin or entering body cavities) and has no known risks or side effects. Not only can an echocardiogram create ultrasound images of heart structures, but it can also produce accurate assessment of the blood flowing through the heart, using pulsed or continuous wave Doppler ultrasound. This allows assessment of both normal and abnormal blood flow through the heart. Echocardiography was the first ultrasound subspecialty to use intravenous contrast.

Fluoroscopy

Fluoroscopy is an imaging technique that uses X-rays to obtain real-time moving images of the internal structures of a patient through the use of a fluoroscope. A fluoroscope consists of an X-ray source and fluorescent screen between which a patient is placed. However, modern fluoroscopes couple the screen to an X-ray image intensifier and CCD video camera allowing the images to be recorded and played on a monitor.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), is a medical imaging technique used in radiology to visualize internal structures of the body in detail. MRI makes use of the property of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to image nuclei of atoms inside the body. MRI can create more detailed images of the human body than possible with X-rays.

An MRI scanner is a device in which the patient lies within a large, powerful magnet where the magnetic field is used to align the magnetization of some atomic nuclei in the body, and radio frequency magnetic fields are applied to systematically alter the alignment of this magnetization. By using gradients in different directions, 2D images or 3D volumes can be obtained in any arbitrary orientation.

MRI provides good contrast between the different soft tissues of the body, which makes it especially useful in imaging the brain, muscles, the heart, and cancers compared with other medical imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT) or X-rays. Unlike CT scans or traditional X-rays, MRI does not use ionizing radiation.

Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty involving the application of radioactive substances in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.

In nuclear medicine procedures, radionuclides are combined with other elements to form chemical compounds to form radiopharmaceuticals. These radiopharmaceuticals, once administered to the patient, can localize to specific organs or cellular receptors. This property of radiopharmaceuticals allows nuclear medicine the ability to image the extent of a disease process in the body, based on the cellular function and physiology, rather than relying on physical changes in the tissue anatomy. In some diseases nuclear medicine studies can identify medical problems at an earlier stage than other diagnostic tests. Nuclear medicine, in a sense, is "radiology done inside out" or "endo-radiology" because it records radiation emitting from within the body rather than radiation that is generated by external sources like X-rays.

Ultrasound

Ultrasound is an oscillating sound pressure wave with a frequency greater than the upper limit of the human hearing range. Ultrasonic devices are used to detect objects and measure distances. Ultrasonic imaging (sonography) is used in medicine to detect invisible flaws.

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To make an appointment, please call
903-640-7373.

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With limited exceptions, physicians are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Texoma Medical Center and TMC Bonham Hospital. The hospitals shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians. TMC Bonham is managed by an affiliate of Texoma Medical Center.

TMC Bonham Hospital
504 Lipscomb Boulevard
Bonham, TX 75418
903-583-8585

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